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It practically gallops!

Irish Coffee

Most plants die when they come to our house. Neither my wife nor I have a green thumb. However, a potted shamrock plant has thrived where others have not.

My wife received the shamrock plant as a birthday gift four months ago. She happened to put it next to the kitchen sink, where it can get light from the nearby window. It’s also easy for me to water the plant almost every day. Apparently light and water are good for plants.

A couple of weeks ago, I was about to throw out my coffee grounds when I remembered something my grandmother used to do. She would put coffee grounds and eggshells on some of the plants in her garden. What, I wondered, would happen if I put coffee grounds on the shamrock plant? I spooned some grounds onto the soil, sprinkled it with water and forgot about it.

Underside of shamrock leaf that changed color after being fertilized with coffee grounds After a while, I noticed a change. The underside of some leaves had taken on a maroon color. The coffee must have been absorbed by the roots and traveled up to the leaves. I am curious if the type of coffee made a difference. The grounds came from one of my favorite dark-roasts, Starbucks Caffè Verona, which I bought at Sam’s Club.

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One Response to “Irish Coffee”

  1. Giannine on July 16th, 2012

    Some plants will change color with acid soil, such as hydrangeas. Coffee grounds will add acid to soil, as will pine needles. In acid soil, hydrangeas’ flowers are blue. Otherwise, their flowers are pink. You will see shamrocks sold in green or in purple. Based on your post, I suspect the purple ones are brought up in acid soil.

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