Brick and Mortarboards

Patricia Cornwell (@1pcornwell) retweeted one of your Tweets! In the 24 hours since we started the campaign to put Dr. Bill Bass on a U.S. postage stamp, we’ve gotten over 100 “likes” on Facebook and a retweet from famous author Patricia Cornwell. Susan Seals suggested the stamp campaign after the dedication ceremony for the Dr. William M. Bass Forensic Anthropology Center on Tuesday.

Dr. William M. Bass Forensic Anthropology Center dedication ceremony - photo by Stacie Bohanan Dr. William M. Bass Forensic Anthropology Center dedication ceremony - ribbon cutting The sun shone brightly on the invited guests. I sat between FBI Public Affairs Specialist Stacie Bohanan and Dr. Arpad Vass. In the moments before the ceremony began, I asked Dr. Vass what would happen to a corpse in the sun. It would desiccate, he told me. It might also turn red as the cells under the skin broke down. An array of deans and professors cut the ribbon, and by ribbon I mean crime-scene tape.

Dr. William M. Bass Forensic Anthropology Center dedication ceremony - photo by Stacie Bohanan Dr. William M. Bass Forensic Anthropology Center dedication ceremony - photo by Stacie Bohanan Stacie shared some of her photos with me. She got a nice shot of me with Dr. Bass. Author Jon Jefferson planted a surprise kiss on my cheek just as Stacie clicked the shutter.

Dr. William M. Bass Forensic Anthropology Center dedication ceremony - autopsy table Dr. William M. Bass Forensic Anthropology Center dedication ceremony - slabs in cooler Before the dedication, we looked around the inside of the building. Several of us joked about climbing onto the autopsy table or onto one of the slabs in the walk-in cooler. In reality, nobody would dare do anything to ruin Dr. Bass’ special day. For the open house, the lab was decorated with large photos of a body going through the various stages of decomposition.

Dr. William M. Bass Forensic Anthropology Center dedication ceremony - Dr. Al Hazari inspects kettles Dr. Al Hazari said it would be funny to climb into one of the huge Blodgett kettles. He did stick his head in for a closer look. In a restaurant, the kettles might be used to cook soup. In the forensic building, they will be used to remove stubborn flesh from bone.

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